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Activisim Events Latest Pride

This Is The Future Queer Liberation Protesters Are Fighting For

ACTIVISM/PRIDE

NYC Queer Liberation March 2020

"It’s 2020, and we are still dealing with issues that we’ve been dealing with for hundreds of years. It’s ridiculous. This needs to end now."

sidewalkkilla

On June 28, instead of celebrating the annual Pride Parade in the usual way – with barricaded streets, company-sponsored floats, and police convoys – the people of New York took to the streets to protest police brutality and walk for Black and Black Trans Lives.

Sidewalkkilla was commissioned by BuzzFeed LGBTQ to interview NYC's Queer Liberation March protesters on their hopes for the future. Find out what brings people out on the streets day after day.

Special thanks to Angel OrtÍz-Perreira for assisting with the project.

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Katie Rose Summerfield

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Bones Jones

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Daniel Nieto

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Rollerena

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J. Alexander

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Gabriella Rosa Morales

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Ty Sunderland

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Glow Job

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Terence, Samy, Luis

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Iman Le Caire

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Cory Walker

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Justin, Onika, Emilie, Spencer, Luke, Jordan

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Angel Ortíz-Perreira

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Jonas Bardin

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Andy Jean

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Steven the Neptunite

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Sugar B.

& Jen Cinclair

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Madelyn Keith &

Graham D'Craquer

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Xander Gaines

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Joel Riviera

@ohmykatierose

Katie Rose Summerfield

What brings you out here today?

I am an artist and a human in the world who cares about the humanity of all people. I think it’s essential that we show up for our brothers and sisters who have not been treated with any fairness, kindness, justice, or humanity for hundreds of years. And it’s time that we all be accomplices in the fight for abolition of white supremacy, racism, the police brutality and inequality across everything.

What are your hopes for the future?

My hopes for the future are that everybody in the world, everybody in America, feels safe to live in the body as they are, to be exactly who they are, to be loved tirelessly and fearlessly, and for everyone to feel safe.

@xo.bones

Bones Jones

What brings you out here today?

I am here today at the Queer Liberation March to liberate humanity, honestly. People of the LGBTQIA+ community are the backbone of how culture moves in this country. So I am here to support humanity in this outfit, have a good time, and support those who need support.

What are your hopes for the future?

My hope for the future is that all people have the same rights, the same opportunities, the same abilities. We’ve seen what happens year after year after year when it comes to these things. It gets us nowhere to just oppress one group of people, so my hope and my wish is that we all just get the equal rights, equal opportunities, and just live in peace. Celebrate in peace, love in peace, have sex in peace.

@daboy13

Daniel Nieto

What brings you out here today?

I am here to fight for freedom, equalities for everybody. Black lives matter, trans lives matter, gay lives matter.

What are your hopes for the future?

My hope for the future is for everyone to be treated equally, with respect, and to have equal freedom and opportunities in this country and everywhere else in the world.

Rollerena

What are your hopes for the future?

My hope for the future is the blue wave on election day, that everybody gets out there and votes. Votes with their conscience and gets this horrible regime out of office.

@daddyl0nglegs

J. Alexander (right)

What brings you out here today?

I’m here for Pride, I’m here for Black liberation. I’m here to take a stand with all the people that are here today.

What are your hopes for the future?

My hope is that when these people go home, they actually do work, and they educate themselves about decolonizing the mind; they have the hard conversation with their racist aunts. I hope that they speak up for people of color — especially Black people — in these safe white spaces. I hope that the work goes beyond the streets and that we see actual change.

Gabriella Rosa Morales

What brings you out here today?

I’m an Afro Latina, bisexual woman, and I’m tired of the bullshit that’s going on. Honestly, it’s time for change and this is what needs to be happening and nobody is listening to us, so we are going to make them listen. So we are going to keep fighting every day until they listen to us, until we get what we need.

What are your hopes for the future?

My hope for the future is that they defund the police, that they treat every citizen the way they need to be treated and that fucking capitalism changes. White supremacy needs to be out of this country. It’s 2020, and we are still dealing with issues that we’ve been dealing with for hundreds of years. It’s ridiculous. This needs to end now.

@ageofaquaria @theejessa @jimmypezzino @tysunderland

Ty Sunderland (right)

& friends

What brings you out here today?

We are marching here for our liberation. We are not free until our entire community is free. Right now we have to be out here marching for Black lives and Black trans lives.

What are your hopes for the future?

A future where we are all free, we are all safe, where we all have equal opportunity, equal rights, and equal access to resources.

@queenglowjob

Glow Job

What brings you out here today?

I am here today, because it’s the Queer Liberation March; it is Pride.

We need to show up; we need to show out. We need to be here for Black lives, for Black trans lives. This feels like, what I imagine maybe, the first Pride was like. It was a freaking protest; it was a riot. And so we are here to make a difference.

What are your hopes for the future?

I feel like things are actually changing for once. I think people are stopping to think… I think they have been disrupted from the system. I want the police to be defunded. I want Black trans people to be respected. I want joy to come back to everyone’s life. That’s why we're here doing this.

@nysocialbee @sameforbrooklyn @hernameisluis

Terence, Samy

& Luis

What brings you out here today?

Terence: What brought me here today was trans rights, Black Lives Matter. An equality for all of us — we are marching together to be with all my sisters and brothers and nonbinary folks.

Luis: I am here with my friends and my community. This is our family. Until all of us are liberated, every single person in our community is liberated — trans, Black, queer, nonbinary, Latino people — the queer community will not stop until all of us are fully equal.

Samy: I'm here because this is the real Pride. It started 51 years ago with Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson — a riot against police brutality — and we are still criminalized and oppressed by the state and the police forces. So we need to continue organizing, running for office, voting, and getting engaged with our community to actually fight for change, including social justice and a [city] budget that really helps our community. So we are honoring that life and that spirit of resistance. This is what this march is — to bring that rioting spirit to actually fight for equal justice.

Terence: And the rights for sex workers, which we can’t forget, because the root people that led the riots and the march were Black and trans sex workers.

What are your hopes for the future?

Samy: Well, I really hope that we don’t have to fight against the state and discrimination, that we live in the society that honestly honors our lives, that we have full respect and we have full equality and justice. And that starts with the Equality Act, but we need so much more.

Legal marriage equality [happened], but that just got us the right to love. Now we need the right so we can walk in the streets without violence and being murdered, so the moment that no Black trans women are being killed in the streets, when people are not discriminated at work, when all the eradication of discrimination happens. That’s why we are truly here; that’s why we are marching. We are not only celebrating that we could march because of the history of our movement, but because there is so much work to be done.

Luis: And of course we hope that the city council of New York defunds the NYPD, defunds the military state in our city and starts funding the real needs of our communities, starts funding education, starts funding housing, starts funding healthcare for people in our community. Because that's where we really want our tax dollars to be devoted to and not to police violence, not to state violence. I really hope that our state officials, our city and our local elected officials react and respond to the clamor that we are all expressing today.

Terence: My hope for the future is that I won’t have to be out on the streets saying "Trans Lives Matter"; I won’t have to be out on the streets saying "Black Lives Matter"; I won’t have to be on the streets saying "Black Trans Lives Matter." It’s beautiful that we are saying those, but the reason that we are out here saying those is because we are continuously killed and there is no justice and we have to keep fighting and protesting. I’m hoping for the future that we no longer have to be out on the streets fighting against the state and state will side with us, and they will give us protection. So that Black trans girls will have protection, Black people will have protection, we want to fight against people that are killing us.

Samy: This is just the city’s Pride as Black Lives Matter rally, because the most important, impacted members of our LGBTQ community are the LGBTQ people of color: Black trans women, Latinx, undocumented queer immigrants. And it is a movement of solidarity. Fighting for racial justice is to fight for queer rights; fighting for queer rights is fighting for racial justice. So we are not only standing in solidarity with Black Lives Matter, we also have Black queer lives, we also have immigrant Latinx queer lives and people of color. So this is a movement of solidarity, but we are both because our struggles are very interconnected. That’s why this Pride, this Queer March is so powerful, because it combines the intersectional lives and identities that we all live and they have been oppressed for so long and this is the moment for liberation.

Luis: And at the end, us browns and Black people, we are also protesting against the mainstream LGBTQ community who has for so long discriminated against us, discriminated against our most vulnerable members. And we are saying today: This is the Pride that we want; this is the Pride that we celebrate and nothing from now on in the future will be less.

Terence: No more.

@imanlecaire

Iman Le Caire

What brings you out here today?

My hope for the future for the Black trans sisters and Black trans brothers, for all brown people and refugees to have jobs and to be walking the streets without getting hurt and killed. I’m tired of it. I’ve been harassed since being 8 years old and I’m sick of it.

What are your hopes for the future?

So I just want to be safe and have opportunities like everybody else. Is that too much to ask? No I don’t think so, so I hope for the future and especially for trans youth to have a better future than I ever had. Hopefully that’s going to happen. I feel optimistic for the future, especially now that we all came together. Hopefully something is going to happen.

And I feel Trump is going to go away.

@corywalkers

Cory Walker

What brings you out here today?

I am out here celebrating Black and brown trans lives and just witnessing a revolution.

It’s been a beautiful way to emerge back into the new world and to be in New York City is such a blessing. Because this is kind of where that kind of liberation began: going to Stonewall and just feeling that energy. I feel like the ancestors are really here. I’m taking it moment by moment; it’s really a lot to digest, but it’s everything we’ve been asking for, so. I think this is our time.

What are your hopes for the future?

Oh, so many. I would say for everyone, every being who enters this plane, this earth, this physical experience, to know that there is so much worthiness and rightness in their existence.

I would love for kids to be born knowing that there is a reason that they are here and that they have the power, that their evolution and their natural flow is going to look so specific for them and that’s beautiful. And I want the people who maybe didn’t have that, who are kind of learning that about themselves now, I want them to heal and be graceful knowing that they always did and survived the best way they knew how.

And for people to just have more empathy and compassion and to really see each other again more, maybe for the first time. We are all kind of seeing ourselves for the first time. I think we are all being initiated into ourselves. So, my hope for the future, my hope for now really, just to continue celebration.

@justinbshow @onikathatbitch @emkouatch @spencer_larue

@luke.mcdonough @jordnalexander

Justin, Onika, Emilie, Spencer, Luke, Jordan

Please, introduce yourself and tell us what brings you out here today.

All: I’m Justin. I’m Emilie. I’m Spencer. I’m Luke. Jordan. Onika.

Justin: Celebrating our Pride, celebrating identities and Black trans lives.

Spencer: Our identities, our brothers, our sisters, everybody in between who just wants to be themselves.

Justin: It’s been really cool. These last few weeks people have been really showing up for each other in a beautiful way, and I feel like I am responsible to be a part of that.

Jordan: Also standing up against police brutality that’s been going on in this country since literally we began and just saying enough is enough. We are done. It needs to be scrapped, and we need to rebuild.

Spencer: As much as COVID sucks, I feel like it’s been a wake-up call that America needs to motivate and take action against police brutality and everything that’s been happening negatively toward our country to move forward.

What are your hopes for the future?

Justin: That we can all just fucking love each other.

Jordan: Yeah, and be able to live without being afraid of literally being killed.

Spencer: Love each other.

Emilie: Respect each other too.

Spencer: Respect each other in a world that’s built out of love, respect and compassion, and not negativity.

@angel_ortizp

Angel Ortíz-Perreira

What brings you out here today?

I am out here today for Black Lives Matter and Black Trans Lives Matter.

What are your hopes for the future?

My hope for the future is for us to understand one another even whether we don’t agree with one another or not. I think finding that common ground of understanding and having those dialogues — that’s the future that we get to have. It really feels like there is an awakening happening in New York, in the world, in every major city. And it’s lovely to be out, even though today is limited in scope.

@jonasbardin

Jonas Bardin

What brings you out here today?

I am here today in support of, particularly, Black trans community as they continue to be marginalized and oppressed throughout this country. And I am here to also remind fellow white people, that this is the work that we need to be focusing on specifically in this moment.

And when we think of Pride, we need to be focalizing Black trans women specifically in our politics and in our minds when we are protesting moving forward.

What are your hopes for the future?

My hopes for the future are dismantling white supremacy and ending capitalism in this country. My hopes are that right now people can find a moment of peace and joy with their friends, maybe even just alone if they are alone today.

These are tumultuous times, but change is never something that is slow and that feels comfortable, so I take it as a good sign.

@qween_jean

Andy Jean (left)

What brings you out here today?

I am here today for Black trans liberation, not only today, but each and every day. Moving forward, so that these folks, honey, [cops] are fucking abolished. Thank you. That’s why I'm here.

What are your hopes for the future?

My hope for the future is that no more Black and brown trans people have to be subjected to violence, that they have to be killed and that they could actually be free, fully, beautifully. That is my dream.

@neptunitesflux

Steven

the Neptunite

What brings you out here today?

I am here in celebration of not only Pride, but I’m also here for Black Lives Matter, because we celebrate Pride, but too often so many people get left out of this movement.

I believe that by combining BLM with LGBTQ+ Pride we can actually bend together and learn intersectionality and learn that we have a common oppressor. This builds a lot of strength to see people of color and queer people of color here as well as white people.

What are your hopes for the future?

My hope for the future is that we get to dress and look however we want and identify however we want and not have to deal with the threatening looks, not have to deal with the shit talk, not have to deal with the potential violence threats and the death threats. That is my hope for the future.

And my hope for the future is also, for us queer people of color to work within ourselves as well, because there is a lot of self-hate among our community; it’s not just our common oppressor. It’s gotten to the point where we teach this shit to ourselves and we need to fix that.

One of my hopes for the future is for us to stand in harmony and as one, like we should have a long time ago.

@sugarb_icny @jencinclair

Sugar B.

& Jen Cinclair

What brings you out here today?

Jen: I am here with one of my besties whom I met at the Imperial Court of New York. She happens to be the first Black biological woman empress of the Imperial Court of New York. She’s fucking amazing, and we marched with our court friends today.

Sugar: I am, like Jen said, one of the first biological women of color, for a cis woman to reign with the Imperial Court of New York. We are a fundraising organization that mostly comprised drag queens, drag kings. We cater to the LGBTQ+ community. We raise money for a lot of organizations. My emperor was actually working at Stonewall when the riots happened. So we are considered the Stonewall monarchs of the Imperial Court of New York.

What are your hopes for the future?

Jen: No regressions. At least keep the rights that we have right now and move forward. No regressions at least step 1, and steps 2 through 50…so many fucking things.

Sugar: I have a basic theory: If you take care of yourself, in turn you take care of other people. Wear your masks; stay inside; don’t believe that you are better than anyone; don’t believe that you are not immune to what's going on. There is a lot of people out here today, but you cannot cancel Pride. Pride is something that we do. But in the same spirit, stay safe. And if you can and when you can stay home… And I hope to hug someone very shortly. Oh my god I miss it. I miss hugging and kissing and loving people — it’s the most amazing thing.

Graham D'Craquer

& Madelyn Keith

What brings you out here today?

Madelyn: My name is Madelyn Keith. I am empress 34 of the Imperial Court of New York.

Graham: And I am Graham D’Craquer, and I am member 29 of the Imperial Court of New York. And we are husbands in real life. So the Imperial Court of New York is a 501c3 charity organization that raises money for LGBTQ+ organizations, and we do it through events. And we figured since there is no Pride parade today, we’d just walk around, spread a little joy, spread a little cheer.

Madelyn: Imperial Court is 35 years old, and we are the producers of Night of the 1000 Gowns, which takes place in the spring. This year, our coronation was canceled due to the coronavirus, but we wanted to come out; we wanted to say hello; we wanted to show people we are here, we are proud, and that we love everybody.

Graham: Absolutely.

What are your hopes for the future?

Madelyn: First, I’d love to see everybody get through this, so we could get back to doing what we do: fundraising and charity, visiting people in hospice, and just bringing a little light to people.

Xander Gaines

What brings you out here today?

It’s Pride. It’s New York. I wanna see my family, my friends, my sisters, and although I can’t be with them the way I normally am, I could be among them so I’m out.

What are your hopes for the future?

A future. That’s my hope. Just having a future.

@joelriveraaa

Joel Rivera

What brings you out here today?

I'm 19 now, and I still got a high school education. I'm in college right now, and I've been an active member of the Black Lives movement since the day I was born and now I'm here.

I do a protest at Stonewall every Thursday. [And] now what I'm currently doing is stopping traffic, because I know when the Pride parades that are led by white people, when they organize they stop the streets. But when it's for Black people, they let the traffic go. They try to dismantle us. So that’s why I’m here; it only takes one person.

I feel like the people here — they don’t want to join in, that’s fine. A lot of people are pussies, I can’t help that. So I’m here just doing that, doing my part, causing chaos, because like I said, I'm not peaceful; I’m not violent. I say I'm not peaceful, because I am here to cause noise, to cause chaos. I'm here to wake people up.

But I'm not violent, because the police are violent. People that hate in their hearts are violent. I don’t have hate in my heart, so I'm not violent.

What are your hopes for the future?

I guess it's kind of cliché: I hope for equality. I hope that if I was to go on a train just like this, I wouldn't face any harassment. I hope that there is a new system that doesn’t see the color of your skin but sees the content of your character. That's what Martin Luther King said.

I hope that every single person in the world, now that’s crazy, but I hope that every single person in the world finds love in their heart. If you have love, it doesn't matter your sexuality, your gender identity, your skin color, because you will just love everybody. And honestly, I take it back when I said it was a stretch. It should not be a stretch to be able to love everyone, but some people just make it so difficult.

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Alexey Kim

Founder

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Categories
Activism Videos Videos

The Annual Trans March During Atlanta Pride

The Annual Trans March Atlanta Pride

ACTIVISM

The Annual Trans March during Atlanta Pride celebrated the visibility of trans & non-binary people, while honoring trans lives lost in 2019.

VIDEOS

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Categories
Events Latest Pride

Taipei’s First Pride After Same-Sex Marriage Legalization

EVENTS | PRIDE


Taipei's

First Pride

After

Same-Sex Marriage Legalization

Around 200K people attended Taipei in October 2019, to celebrate same year's major win for the island as the 1st country in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage.

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Due to Taiwan passing same-sex marriage legislation on May 24 of 2019, Taipei Pride was slated to be the biggest one yet. The tumultuous history of getting marriage between same-sex couples legalized spanned almost two decades, culminating in the Constitutional Court’s ruling that the Civil Code’s clauses relating to marriage were unconstitutional. The person responsible for setting the landmark precedent in Asia, by applying for a marriage license back in 2013, is a 61-year-old gay / AIDS pioneer / activist Chi Chia-wei. Chi Chia-wei has been an activist for over 30 years, and was the first person in Taiwan to come out as gay on television, during a self-organized press conference back in 1986.

The theme for this year’s parade was “Together, Make Taiwan Better,” marking the 17th year of its observance. Nearly 200,000 people attended this year’s march according to parade organizers Taiwan LGBT Pride. The 3.4-mile-long parade route began at Taipei City Hall and ended at the Presidential Palace, where a performance stage greeted everyone who managed to finish the long march that went on for about 7 hours.

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Artist Deng Yunxiang and a friend hold a perforamnce-art protest. Deng's sign reads "Today's Honk Kong can be tomorrow's Taiwan."

The first time I heard about the budding Taipei queer scene was at this year’s Wigwood Miami festival, from Jacksonville drag queen Didi. She told me that I should get in contact with a drag queen named Popcorn who resides in Taipei by way of New Zealand. I reached out to Popcorn a few months back and asked if it would be worth checking out Taipei’s pride parade this year, to which she replied “With the legalization of same-sex marriage earlier this year, it should be much larger than previous years (already being the largest in Asia).” She also mentioned that she would invite me to the techno / art / queer Spectrum Formosus festival held at a tea farm the weekend following Pride, and that was enough for me to get wet and book my trip ASAP.

The parade was scheduled to take off at 1:30 pm, with thousands of people accumulating at Taipei City Hall’s plaza. Hordes of people were getting ready to march, half of them crammed into the narrow street of the vendor-lined Rainbow Market. The parade was divided into six sections, each one representing a different color of the rainbow, with five flags representing bisexual, trans, pansexual, asexual, and intersex groups leading the six sections along the route. Thirty companies registered this year to sponsor and participate in the parade – a record number for Taiwan. In contrast, this year’s NYC’s WorldPride included over 100 sponsor companies.

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A newlywed same-sex couple poses with their pet

Along the Rainbow Market people were getting ready to step off: several muscular Taiwanese guys were putting on their golden wings before boarding the Grindr float; drag queens were finishing up their final make-up touches; people were taking a dip in a bathtub filled with plastic bubbles created by MAC cosmetics; and local artist Deng Yunxiang was holding a performance-art demonstration warning everyone that “Today’s Hong Kong can be tomorrow’s Taiwan.

A very skinny older gentleman dressed in everything rainbow caught my attention. He was standing to the side, all by himself – a huge rainbow flag on a metallic pole sticking out of his backpack with two teddy bears attached to either side. I recognized him instantly – it was Chi Chia-wei himself! Along the parade route I ran into him two more times: once on the balcony of a shopping plaza, where news media outlets swarmed around him; and on a building’s rooftop, where he swayed his flag incessantly. During one of the interviews I overheard a Taiwanese interpreter, translating for an American white male journalist, saying that even though Chi Chia-wei is joyous over the recent turn of events, there is more work that needs to be done.

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Chi Chia-wei

Indeed, even though the same-sex marriage bill was recently introduced and over a thousand couples have gotten married so far this year, they still cannot exercise all of the same rights that heterosexual couples are able to enjoy. Same-sex couples can currently only “adopt their partners’ biological children and … only marry foreigners from countries where gay marriage is also recognized.” Some of the local LGBTQ people have expressed that even though it seems that Taiwan is open and accepting of the new law, there is still a big chunk of conservative opposition, especially outside of Taipei. Nonetheless, the future seems hopeful for Taiwan’s LGBTQ community, as Chi Chia-wei stated to Thomson Reuters Foundation: “Taiwan has taken a big step, other countries will not need another 30 years to get there.”

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Alexey Kim

Founder

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Categories
Events Milkshake

Milkshake Festival: Love Is The Message (NSFW)

FESTIVALS

Milkshake:

Love Is The Message

Milkshake is a 2-day dance festival in Amsterdam, with a clear message: respect, freedom, love, tolerance and out of the box thinking.

sidewalkkilla

Every year, Milkshake Festival and Pride Walk kick off official Amsterdam Pride celebrations on the same day. Milkshake Fest is a collaboration between two major clubs based in Amsterdam: Paradiso and AIR. The festival takes over Westerpark every July for an entire weekend of fun, drugs, music and an encouragement to express yourself in any way you want. As many as 11 stages are strewn all over the park, some of them hidden out of plain sight. "For All Who Love" is the festival's motto and it's plain to see.

I found out about the Milkshake festival in 2017 from the Instagram account of The Scarlet Woman of the West, Love Bailey. The photos that she posted from the event looked so sunny and inviting, it looked like the heaven for the rebels of society.

I was finally able to make it out to Europe in the summer of 2019 and Milkshake was going to be the final stop on my mini tour of getting acquainted with the Eurpoean queer communities. What I failed to realize, was that Milkshake is only the beginning of a week of Pride celebrations in Amsterdam, so I was going to be missing some major street parties, the Drag Olympics, and the Canal Parade.

Love Bailey performing "Shenis"

On the first day of Milkshake I had a rude awakening. I hadn’t even entered the grounds of the festival before I was smashed in the face with my own camera by an already-twisted attendee. The guy didn’t even apologize and just kept on moving along in his hazy state. I was trying to pretend that everything was okay– even though my eye was throbbing with pain– and told my subject to continue posing. “Honey, are you sure you are okay? Your eye is bleeding.” I looked into my phone camera and saw that I had two deep cuts under my eye and I was basically crying blood tears. “Cool! This shall serve me as a battlescar,” I thought and went off to find the nearest medic.

The nearest medic turned out to be a veterinarian, and after I told her I had been kicked in the eye, she asked me, with great concern on her face, if it was someone at the festival that hit me. I laughed and said it was an accident, this comes with the tough job of being a journalist. It made me feel kind of badass, like it gave me a sort of street cred, while going pretty well with my Lara Croft-inspired outfit.

Take your dick pick

The magnitude of the festival was truly shocking. With 11 stages in total– some of them hidden– there was plenty to explore. It was like a drug-induced partyland for adults. There was a huge tower by the entrance comprised of dick pics measured against various objects, from empty toilet rolls to Pringles boxes. Each stage had its own theme and it’s own musical genre, the biggest and the most impressive one being the Supertoys stage with a Ferris wheel attached to its back. Melanie C and Honey Dijon were amongst the headliners of the stage.

There was a backyard -looking party corner where people could ride a mechanical dick; a luminous sex room in the shape of a diamond that was placed right in the middle of a rave club, where I witnessed a straight couple, a lesbian couple, and a gay orgy getting it on all at the same time; there were guys who were walking around completely naked with unfailable cock rings; an area with human-sized blow-up balloons, where one could squeeze themselves into them and be at the mercy of a drunk girl rolling them all over the field; there was mostly vegan food and one refillable plastic cup per person rule; there was a huge funhouse and a Ferris wheel; drag and voguing performances; and most importantly a lot of fucked-up, crazy-outfit-wearing friendly people from all walks of life who were having fun and getting along famously.

Throughout the whole weekend many MCs were spreading the same messages of love, freedom, living the moment, and celebrating ourselves as we are. Milkshake represents life as it is– crazy, beautiful, ugly and full of surprises. “Nothing should be a must, anything is possible,'' is one of the festival's many mottos. At the end of the day, Milkshake is a great equalizer, it shows the simple truth that we are all in this together and that we can all co-exist and be happy no matter our physical or mental differences.

Unforchunately, the festival had to be cancelled in 2020 due to coronavirus, but that didn't stop the organizers from arrangin dinner and brunch shows at cafe restaurant Bureau. Tickets to The Magic Milkshake Soirée Brunch on July 25 are still available HERE.

The 2019 event was beautiful and overwhelming, crazy and eye-opening, raw and real, exhausting and exhilarating, and I cannot wait to go back in the future.

FULL COVERAGE

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Alexey Kim

Founder

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Events Pride

NYC Hosts WorldPride And Celebrates 50th Anniversary Of Stonewall Riots, 2019

EVENTS | PRIDE


NYC Hosts WorldPride And Celebrates 50th Anniversary Of Stonewall Riots, 2019

We tried to walk in the parade and failed, but we still took some amazing shots and made a bunch of beautiful friends. Take a peek at this year’s WorldPride parade’s faces and moments.

Our friend and copy editor Barrianne told us that she would be marching in the Pride March with Brazilian percussion group Maracatu New York as part of The New School Pride contingent. We thought it would be cool to take photos from inside of the parade this year and asked to tag along.

On the way there we loaded ourselves into a subway car with no air. One of the girls who was also heading to the parade said, in good humor, that the MTA is trying to prepare us for hell. The whole car laughed, including two white gay dads with an adorable adopted Black daughter wearing a rainbow dress.

Once we found our friend, we found out that due to the record number of people visiting and marching this year, step-off times for each section were delayed for hours. We left Barri for a couple of hours to score some weed, get acquainted with the area, and take some photos on a completely closed-off Madison Avenue.

So many amazing and diverse groups of the LGBTQ+ community were stuck together on the same street –it was simply fascinating to explore. Our street was headlined by NYC angels – a group of gorgeous trans women of color who wore huge feather wings while waiting around for hours, but still managed to keep up their spirits and flawlessness; right behind them was The Eagle bar truck, where men dressed in latex and leather, or just chains and underwear, were patiently awaiting their turn to march; there was an Indian group, where one of the girls wore a gorgeous sari and a leather bra and a choker; a Japanese group dressed in gorgeous rainbow kimonos were politely waiting on the sidewalk and one of them told us that it was her first time in drag out in public. So many amazing stories and faces, it was hard to move away from one spot.

After a while we’ve told Barri that we would have to split and made our way down the parade. It was insane and packed and beautiful. We’ve had a moment to reflect and be thankful for being able to live in this incredible city and not hide our true identities – not a lot of other places in the world are able to experience such joy of freedom, and we always try to keep that in mind. We truly believe that one day, love will save the world.

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Alexey Kim

Founder

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Events Pride

Harlem Pride with Dominique Jackson from “Pose”, 2019

EVENTS | PRIDE


Harlem Pride 2019 With Dominique Jackson

Harlem Pride feels small, yet intimate. Sidewalkkilla's office is located just several blocks away, and when we walked over with our crop tops, it seemed that we were the only ones going to a queer event. Faint whispers of music carried over to us by the wind were the only indication that we were heading the right way.

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I’ve personally always found it romantic that the stage is almost hidden under the awning of a bridge, surrounded by tall trees and flowering bushes. The bridge’s underpass, located on a sloped-down street, feels almost like a portal that transports you into a tucked-away gathering of the gayborhood.

It was surprising to see Dominique Jackson from Pose on FX, hosting on the mic. At some point during the event she taught us all a very powerful lesson: one of the community members was called to the stage to celebrate their hard work on a new show about female strippers called Pussy Valley that is coming soon to STARZ; they were hesitant to come up, but Dominique refused to accept the hesitation and proclaimed that we should accept when we are being celebrated. We haven’t heard anything truer and on point in a while.

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Celebrations outside of the main stage had to be quickly wrapped up due to the pouring rain. Whoever was brave enough to stay was treated to a rap performance by the legendary Precious, followed by a vogue battle and her explaining that the dip is not a shablam or a death drop. Elektra… Oops… Dominique Jackson stayed under the bridge a while after the wrap up to catch up with her friends and fans.

One of the recurring themes during this Pride Month were mentions about companies and corporations appropriating LGBTQ+ culture and stealing our talents. Precious’s call to action was to steal our creativity back by being even more creative. As Aja, a Drag Race alumni, told everyone at Wynwood Pride, “Copyright everything you do, because your shit will get stolen.”

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Alexey Kim

Founder

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Events Pride

NYC Pride Parade 2018- Portraits And Candid Moments


EVENTS | PRIDE

NYC Pride Parade 2018- Portraits And Candid Moments

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I believe it’s safe to say that during the NYC Pride in 2018, no one has had a slightest idea of how unbelievably enormous the WorldPride would be in 2019. Even though the numbers of the attendees in 2018 weren’t as close to the numbers of people flocking to celebrate WorldPride and The Stonewall Riots’ 50th Anniversary in the following year, it was still an impressive show out. Let’s take a walk back the memory lane and catch up on some magnificent moments from the New York’s Pride March of 2018.




































































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Alexey Kim

Founder

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